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Main Campus

  • T: 1-978-369-1400
  • Find a physician 24/7:
    1-877-936-3776
  • TTY: 1-800-439-0183


Campus Map

Hermel Breast Health Center in Concord

  • T: 1-978-287-8107
  • Find a physician 24/7:
    1-877-936-3776
  • TTY: 1-800-439-0183

Westford Health Center

  • T: 1-978-589-6999
  • TTY: 1-800-439-0183

Ultrasound



TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT

Call 1-978-287-3003 to schedule an appointment for an ultrasound.

TO OBTAIN TEST RESULTS

Requires a signed medical records release and ID.

Just reports: 978-287-3870
Reports & images: 978-287-2925

  • Preparing for a Pelvic Ultrasound

    • You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for your ultrasound exam. You may need to remove all clothing and jewelry in the area to be examined.
    • You may be asked to wear a gown during the procedure.
    • Pelvic Ultrasound
      • You will need to drink 24 ounces of fluid (water, juice, coffee or tea) finished one hour prior. Be sure not to empty your bladder before your procedure. A full bladder is needed for the procedure. A full bladder helps to visualize the uterus, ovaries, bladder wall and prostate gland for transabdominal ultrasound.
    • Pelvic Ultrasound or Pelvic Transvaginal Ultrasound
      • You will need to drink 24 ounces of fluid (water, juice, coffee or tea) finished one hour prior. Be sure not to empty your bladder before your procedure. A full bladder is needed for the procedure.
  • What to Expect During the Exam

    • During the exam, a sonographer trained in ultrasound imaging will press a small hand-held transducer against your skin and move it over the area being examined. A small amount of gel will be used to help eliminate air pockets between your skin and the device.
    • A full bladder pushes the bowel out of the way and helps transmit the sound waves for the ultrasound.
    • If you are receiving a transvaginal ultrasound, the transducer will be attached to a probe and inserted into the vagina to view the uterus and ovaries. This exam is performed with the bladder empty. A long slender probe with a transducer on the end is inserted into the vagina. This provides more detailed images of the uterus and ovaries.
    • The transducer sends information to a computer, which composes detailed images based on the patterns created by the sound waves.
    • If you have an IUD (intrauterine contraceptive device), 3D imaging will be performed to determine the position of the device.
    • Ultrasound is usually a painless procedure. However, you may experience some mild discomfort as the sonographer guides the transducer into or over your body, especially if you're required to have a full bladder. A typical ultrasound exam takes from 30 minutes to an hour.

  • After the Exam

    • You may wish to empty your bladder before leaving the facility.
    • There should be little to no lasting discomfort after your procedure, and there are no post-procedure requirements for patients.
  • About Pelvic Ultrasounds

    Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography, involves exposing part of the body to high-frequency sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of the body. Ultrasound exams do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays). Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels.

    A pelvic ultrasound provides pictures of the structures and organs in the lower abdomen or pelvis. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound:

    • Abdominal (transabdominal)
    • Vaginal (transvaginal, endovaginal) for women

    A Doppler ultrasound exam may be part of your pelvic ultrasound examination to evaluate blood flow in the ovaries and uterus. It is a special ultrasound technique that evaluates blood velocity as it flows through a blood vessel, including the body's major arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs and neck.

    For additional information visit www.radiologyinfo.org